Courses

The aim of this course is to equip students with the writing skills they need to carry out graduate level work at CEU, as well as in any professional or academic English-speaking environment. The program includes a taught course and individual writing consultations. The taught course introduces the basics of...
Credits: 0.0
The aim of this program is to equip students with the writing skills they need to carry out graduate level work at CEU, as well as in any professional or academic English-speaking environment. The program includes a taught course and individual writing consultations.The taught course introduces the basics of academic...
Credits: 0.0
The program includes a taught course and individual writing consultations. The taught course introduces the basics of academic writing, including the concept of genre, structure and style. We will analyze issues involved in several different types of writing, asking students to find and to look at examples, before...
Credits: 0.0
The aim of this course is to equip students with the writing skills they need to carry out graduate level work at CEU, as well as in any professional or academic English-speaking environment. The program includes a taught course and individual writing consultations. The taught course introduces the basics of academic...
Credits: 0.0
Much of the data in political science (and in the social sciences, in general) are categorical, and overlooking this feature often leads to the application of inappropriate methods of analysis. While categorical data carry the possibility of revealing more complex association structures than those that may be...
Instructor: Tamas Rudas
Credits: 2.0
This course aims to introduce the students to social science discourse analysis, i.e. to a family of approaches that emphasise the constructed nature of politics and the importance of struggles over interpretive and definitory hegemony for political processes and for the definition of political “realities”. The course...
Instructor: Lea Sgier
Credits: 2.0
The course is designed to provide scholars with a basic understanding of multilevel (a.k.a. hierarchical or mixed) models. Upon completion the students will have a basic conceptual understanding of multilevel modeling and its statistical foundations. Students will be able to critically assess the appropriateness of...
Instructor: Levente Littvay
Credits: 2.0
The course is designed to provide scholars with a basic understanding of structural equation modeling (SEM). Special attention is given to the translation of theoretical expectations into SEM, the interpretation of results in SEM analyses and the general use and misuse of SEM in the social sciences. While the course...
Instructor: Levente Littvay
Credits: 2.0
States claim to have authority to govern within their jurisdiction. Authority is generally understood as entailing a right to be obeyed correlative with a moral obligation incumbent on the subjects of authority to obey (provided that certain conditions obtain). The obligation to obey is said to be general (although...
Instructor: Janos Kis
Credits: 4.0
Much of the data in political science (and the social sciences, in general) are categorical/nominal and overlooking this feature often leads to the application of inappropriate methods of analysis. While categorical data make it possible to reveal more complex association structures than those that may be discovered...
Instructor: Tamas Rudas
Credits: 2.0
Master of Arts in Political Science Program - elective courseMaster of Arts in Political Science (2 years) Program - elective course This course focuses on the ways contemporary democracies are scrutinized, analyzed, evaluated, and innovations proposed in the field of comparative politics. We approach this broad...
Credits: 2.0
This 2-credit course offers theoretical and comparative analysis of democracies with a special attention to the new democracies of Central Europe. First, we will analyze different theoretical models of democracy (direct, participatory, representative, elitist, populist, plebiscitary, national, transnational, global,...
Instructor: Andras Bozoki
Credits: 2.0
This course focuses on the ways contemporary democracies are analyzed, evaluated and innovations proposed. The course is divided into several parts. The first part concentrates on the ontological aspects – on the concepts, models and patterns of democratic regimes. The second part focuses on challenges and...
Instructor: Radek Markowski
Credits: 2.0
The course will cover two, often related topics: utopia and anarchy. It will be jointly taught by Professors Bozóki and Czigányik.  The course focuses on the overlaps and relationships between utopianism and anarchism. Utopianism is usually understood in everyday discourse as irrational and irresponsible dreaming...
Credits: 4.0
The purpose of this course to teach you how to conduct computer assisted statistical analysis. We will learn how to work with data, how to do all the statistical examples we conducted in the first 6 weeks using a computer and more (including multiple regression and the testing of its assumptions). Following the...
Instructor: Levente Littvay
Credits: 2.0
2nd half of Fall Semester (Nov 2 - Dec 8)Statistics is an integral part of political science research. We live in a world where there is no shortage of numerical data and there is increasing demand for people who know how to make sense of it independent of the field of work. The goal of this course is to turn you into...
Instructor: Levente Littvay
Credits: 2.0
Statistics is an integral part of political science research. We live in a world where there is no shortage of numerical data and there is increasing demand for people who know how to make sense of it independent of the eld of work. The goal of this course is to turn you into one of these people. In a prior class you...
Instructor: Levente Littvay
Credits: 2.0
Why did the Tatmadaw (Myanmar’s Armed Forces) allow transition from direct military to civilian rule in 2011? Will North Korea’s regime ever collapse and if so what would change look like? What caused Russia’s de-democratization? What explains the roll-back (democratic backsliding)? How important are economic and non-...
Instructor: Matteo Fumagalli
Credits: 2.0
Advanced topics course for International Relations and Comparative Politics track students.Why did the Tatmadaw (Myanmar’s Armed Forces) allow transition from direct military to civilian rule in 2011? Will North Korea’s regime collapse and if so what would change look like? What caused Russia’s de-democratization? ...
Instructor: Matteo Fumagalli
Credits: 2.0
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Instructor: Martijn Schoonvelde
Credits: 2.0
The period of universal acceptance of democracy as the most preferred political regime type is certainly over. Several dozen countries in the world today are considered by major ranking institutions as not free. A new – a decade or so - phenomenon seems rightly to attract our attention. Increasing number of 'partly...
Instructor: Radek Markowski
Credits: 2.0
This course will provide an introduction to practical methods for making inferences from data using probabilistic models for observed and missing data.  This approach is an alternative to frequentist statistics, the presently dominant inference technique in sciences, and it supports a common-sense interpretation...
Instructor: József Fiser
Credits: 2.0
This short course is intended to provide an introduction to empirical models of Public Choice and political economy.  Because this is such a huge topic (see esp. Dennis Mueller, Public Choice, 3rd edition.  Cambridge University, 2002) we will focus on spatial models of politics. While there is a tradition of...
Instructor: Bernard Grofman
Credits: 2.0
The course primarily focuses on the five post-Soviet states of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. It is structured in four sections. The first part offers an introduction to the region, including key events of the 130 years of Russian dominance in Central Asia and the regional...
Instructor: Matteo Fumagalli
Credits: 4.0
How can political theory and cognitive science inform policy-making? Can policy be improved by taking elements of these theories into account? What normative issues does cognitive science raise for politics and political philosophy? In order to approach these questions, we will review recent work done in cognitive...
Credits: 4.0

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